A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson

A God in Ruins is a companion piece to Kate Atkinson’s time-travelling World War II drama Life After Life. (I read the latter back in 2014, and although I appear to have only rated it 3/5, hindsight must have softened my judgement because I’m sure I remember loving it.) Given the nature of Life After […]

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Resistance by Val McDermid

Resistance is a fun little apocalypse tale from the Queen of Crime. It’s super short at barely over two hours long, but it began life as a radio drama in three 45 minute segments, so was never intended to be a full-length feature. The story follows frustrated journalist Zoe, whose serious stories have fallen out […]

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Adamtine by Hannah Berry

As with Tenth of December, I wouldn’t have come across Adamtine were it not for The Guardian’s regular Top 10 book list feature. (Browsing it is an excellent way to kill quiet periods at work, and my to-read list has been growing exponentially in recent weeks). Adamtine came recommended as being amongst the top ten […]

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He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly

I’ve been weaning myself off constant thrillers this year, but I really enjoyed He Said/She Said. It’s far more than the ‘did-he-didn’t-he?’ rape accusation that the title implies. Our heroine is Laura, who witnesses what she believes to be a rape taking place at an eclipse festival. The ramifications reverberate down the years, following through […]

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Six Stories by Matt Wesolowski

I took a chance on Six Stories with only the vaguest impression of what to expect, and I’m very glad I did. It’s not often I splurge my monthly Audible credit on something I’ve never heard of, but this well and truly hit the mark. Stylised like a serial podcast, with small interconnecting sections referencing […]

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Tenth of December by George Saunders

Tenth of December was an unexpected gem. I was totally unfamiliar with George Saunders before reading a Guardian list of top ten books about the apocalypse. The review by Michelle Tea promised: “If you love Black Mirror, this collection is for you. Saunders’ grip on how today’s technological folly may lead to tomorrow’s grotesque inhumanity […]

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