Smoke and Mirrors by Neil Gaiman

Smoke and Mirrors was a present from a friend for my birthday, and I was so psyched when I opened it. There have been some Neil Gaiman short stories that I’ve absolutely loved, and while this collection wasn’t full of solid gems, there were some fantastic pieces. One of my favourite stories is tucked away […]

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The Competition by Marcia Clark

In 2016, largely thanks to American Crime Story, I became somewhat obsessed with the OJ Simpson trial. Among the books I read on the subject was Marcia Clark’s Without a Doubt. I enjoyed it to the point that I noted similarities between it and Michael Connelly’s Mickey Haller series, and as a result made a […]

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Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

Men Explain Things To Me didn’t do much for me at all. To some extent it’s probably down to unmet expectations – I was expecting a witty takedown of mansplaining, and instead got some angry, unconnected thoughts on male violence, rape, and – inexplicably – Virginia Woolf. Considering that the blurb describes the chief essay […]

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The Road to Jonestown by Jeff Guinn

Sometimes I’m an idiot, and sometimes it works out okay anyway. I decided I wanted to take some non-fiction with me on holiday, something true-crime-ish. Hadn’t I always wanted to read about that historical event where all the people died? Yeah, thanks brain. I ended up buying Jonestown thinking I was going to read about […]

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Post-Truth by Matthew d’Ancona

In his text on the post-truth era, Matthew d’Ancona sums up post-truth politics as “the triumph of the visceral over the rational, the deceptively simple over the honestly complex”. It’s a sage and timely piece, reflecting primarily on Brexit and the rise of Trump, but also the movement’s historical background, psychology, and how we can […]

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