After the Crash by Michel Bussi

Unusually for me, I really can’t remember where I first came across this book. It’s easy to see why I was drawn to download it though, with the premise promising a compelling thriller. When a plane crashes into a Franco-Swiss mountainside, only one passenger survives – a three month old baby. When two families step […]

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Penpal by Dathan Auerbach

I originally read Penpal in its earliest form, as a post in the “nosleep” sub on Reddit. Since then it’s been edited, expanded, and published as a novel, so I’ve had it on my Kindle for a good while waiting to see how it turned out. Disappointingly, it really wasn’t all that different. The content […]

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Triumph of Justice by Daniel Petrocelli

Triumph of Justice is my third foray into the OJ Simpson trial, following Marcia Clark’s Without a Doubt and Jeffrey Toobin’s The Run of His Life: The People versus O.J. Simpson. Unlike those texts, Triumph of Justice focuses on Simpson’s civil trial rather than the unsuccessful criminal trial, and was penned by Daniel Petrocelli, the […]

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NOS4R2 by Joe Hill (narrated by Kate Mulgrew)

Embarrassing as it is to admit, the first time I read about NOS4R2, I just didn’t get it. I didn’t get the summary about gifted “finder” Vic McQueen, her magic bike and covered bridge, and I didn’t get her nemesis, child snatcher Charlie Manx, his magic car and eternal Christmasland. Even more than that, though, […]

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Guns by Stephen King

As a huge Stephen King fan, Guns was the first Kindle Single I ever bought, way back in May 2013. It’s languished at the back of my Kindle since then, waiting for the right moment, which recently presented itself in the form of a gargantuan passport control queue. More strongly than with most of Uncle […]

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The Kafenion by Victoria Hislop

All The Kafenion really has going for it is atmosphere. Hislop has a huge talent when it comes to evoking Greece, particularly through tastes and textures, but this bite-sized morsel is too minuscule for substance. In it, we encounter twins with wildly differing ideas over business ownership, to the point that their mother performs a […]

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Six Four by Hideo Yokoyama

As a huge fan of crime fiction, Six Four sounded exactly my cup of tea. The accompanying hype proudly announces that it sold one million copies within six days of release. Combined with the promise of a cold-case kidnapping yielding unexpected results, I anticipated a thrilling page turner full of twists and turns. What I […]

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