The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

Gosh this book is strange. I’m still not sure whether it’s good-strange or bad-strange, but I managed to enjoy it an awful lot despite its inherent weirdness. What makes it so odd is that Horowitz inserts himself slap-bang into the middle of events as a walking, talking self-insert. He doesn’t do anything so dreadfully generic […]

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Yesterday by Felicia Yap

Yesterday is a high-concept thriller, set in a world where no one’s memory lasts more than two days. The majority of the population are “Monos”, who retain all memories before the age of 18, and just a single day’s worth of short term memories. “Duos” are luckier – they remember up to the age of […]

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The Competition by Marcia Clark

In 2016, largely thanks to American Crime Story, I became somewhat obsessed with the OJ Simpson trial. Among the books I read on the subject was Marcia Clark’s Without a Doubt. I enjoyed it to the point that I noted similarities between it and Michael Connelly’s Mickey Haller series, and as a result made a […]

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The Road to Jonestown by Jeff Guinn

Sometimes I’m an idiot, and sometimes it works out okay anyway. I decided I wanted to take some non-fiction with me on holiday, something true-crime-ish. Hadn’t I always wanted to read about that historical event where all the people died? Yeah, thanks brain. I ended up buying Jonestown thinking I was going to read about […]

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The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

The Woman in Cabin 10 wasn’t what I was expecting. I’ve read in the past about people who disappear from cruises never to be seen again, with very little investigation due to the jurisdiction issues of international waters. Ware’s book does touch on that briefly, but the vessel here is more of a grand yacht […]

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The Burial Hour by Jeffery Deaver

I became a Jeffery Deaver fan by total happenstance, which isn’t something you can say about most authors. Back around 2007, when I was a student at Edinburgh University, I wandered into my local Waterstones and happened to hit the very tail end of a signing for The Sleeping Doll – the first in Deaver’s […]

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The Steel Kiss by Jeffery Deaver

The Steel Kiss is the first Jeffery Deaver book I’ve read in too long a while. Having first come to Mr. Deaver’s writing through his excellent short story collections (Twisted and More Twisted), I’m also technically six books into the Lincoln Rhyme series. But when The Steel Kiss, twelfth in the series, showed up as […]

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