What She Knew by Gilly Macmillan

What She Knew is a serviceable thriller, which ultimately muddles around too much to pack a powerful punch. Sure to touch a nerve with parents, it follows the disappearance of seven-year-old Ben, who runs ahead one day in the woods, only to vanish entirely. Mother Rachel is understandably distraught, but as a narrator seems far […]

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Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

In my September review of The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair, I concluded by saying: “If I read a better crime novel this year, I’d be very surprised.” Well, colour me surprised. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz is such gloriously good fun. The only Horowitz I’ve read previously was the Alex Rider series as […]

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Out of Bounds by Val McDermid

Out of Bounds is so good. So good. Even as a longstanding Val McDermid fan, that praise doesn’t come lightly. I don’t think I’ve quite read all thirty of her books (there were a few early Lindsay Gordons I may have missed), but it comes damn close. I went through a shaky patch were I […]

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Triumph of Justice by Daniel Petrocelli

Triumph of Justice is my third foray into the OJ Simpson trial, following Marcia Clark’s Without a Doubt and Jeffrey Toobin’s The Run of His Life: The People versus O.J. Simpson. Unlike those texts, Triumph of Justice focuses on Simpson’s civil trial rather than the unsuccessful criminal trial, and was penned by Daniel Petrocelli, the […]

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Six Four by Hideo Yokoyama

As a huge fan of crime fiction, Six Four sounded exactly my cup of tea. The accompanying hype proudly announces that it sold one million copies within six days of release. Combined with the promise of a cold-case kidnapping yielding unexpected results, I anticipated a thrilling page turner full of twists and turns. What I […]

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