The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

Gosh this book is strange. I’m still not sure whether it’s good-strange or bad-strange, but I managed to enjoy it an awful lot despite its inherent weirdness. What makes it so odd is that Horowitz inserts himself slap-bang into the middle of events as a walking, talking self-insert. He doesn’t do anything so dreadfully generic […]

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Yesterday by Felicia Yap

Yesterday is a high-concept thriller, set in a world where no one’s memory lasts more than two days. The majority of the population are “Monos”, who retain all memories before the age of 18, and just a single day’s worth of short term memories. “Duos” are luckier – they remember up to the age of […]

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Post-Truth by Matthew d’Ancona

In his text on the post-truth era, Matthew d’Ancona sums up post-truth politics as “the triumph of the visceral over the rational, the deceptively simple over the honestly complex”. It’s a sage and timely piece, reflecting primarily on Brexit and the rise of Trump, but also the movement’s historical background, psychology, and how we can […]

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Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

Big Little Lies is the sort of read I could see unfolding perfectly as a Desperate Housewives-esque TV show, and for most of the time I spent reading it, I was convinced that I’d watch the series after finishing. Once I reached that point, however, I realised that I’d really already ‘seen’ it all and […]

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The Burial Hour by Jeffery Deaver

I became a Jeffery Deaver fan by total happenstance, which isn’t something you can say about most authors. Back around 2007, when I was a student at Edinburgh University, I wandered into my local Waterstones and happened to hit the very tail end of a signing for The Sleeping Doll – the first in Deaver’s […]

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He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly

I’ve been weaning myself off constant thrillers this year, but I really enjoyed He Said/She Said. It’s far more than the ‘did-he-didn’t-he?’ rape accusation that the title implies. Our heroine is Laura, who witnesses what she believes to be a rape taking place at an eclipse festival. The ramifications reverberate down the years, following through […]

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Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah

“If I ever get to rate this kidnapping on TripAdvisor, I’ll give it four stars instead of three.” Did You See Melody? is such a good thriller. I’ve had a love-hate relationship with Sophie Hannah’s Culver Valley series – mostly because she can write a damn good plot, but her regular characters are frequently insufferable. […]

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