Habit Stacking by S.J. Scott

This is a hard book to review, mainly because some tips were very useful, and others… seemed geared towards robots trying to assimilate on Earth. S.J. Scott is the author of around 30 books (rounded down because a few on Goodreads appear to be translated versions). Of those, 19 have the word ‘habit’ in the […]

Continue reading →

Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

Men Explain Things To Me didn’t do much for me at all. To some extent it’s probably down to unmet expectations – I was expecting a witty takedown of mansplaining, and instead got some angry, unconnected thoughts on male violence, rape, and – inexplicably – Virginia Woolf. Considering that the blurb describes the chief essay […]

Continue reading →

The Road to Jonestown by Jeff Guinn

Sometimes I’m an idiot, and sometimes it works out okay anyway. I decided I wanted to take some non-fiction with me on holiday, something true-crime-ish. Hadn’t I always wanted to read about that historical event where all the people died? Yeah, thanks brain. I ended up buying Jonestown thinking I was going to read about […]

Continue reading →

Post-Truth by Matthew d’Ancona

In his text on the post-truth era, Matthew d’Ancona sums up post-truth politics as “the triumph of the visceral over the rational, the deceptively simple over the honestly complex”. It’s a sage and timely piece, reflecting primarily on Brexit and the rise of Trump, but also the movement’s historical background, psychology, and how we can […]

Continue reading →