Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

Men Explain Things To Me didn’t do much for me at all. To some extent it’s probably down to unmet expectations – I was expecting a witty takedown of mansplaining, and instead got some angry, unconnected thoughts on male violence, rape, and – inexplicably – Virginia Woolf. Considering that the blurb describes the chief essay […]

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The Road to Jonestown by Jeff Guinn

Sometimes I’m an idiot, and sometimes it works out okay anyway. I decided I wanted to take some non-fiction with me on holiday, something true-crime-ish. Hadn’t I always wanted to read about that historical event where all the people died? Yeah, thanks brain. I ended up buying Jonestown thinking I was going to read about […]

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Post-Truth by Matthew d’Ancona

In his text on the post-truth era, Matthew d’Ancona sums up post-truth politics as “the triumph of the visceral over the rational, the deceptively simple over the honestly complex”. It’s a sage and timely piece, reflecting primarily on Brexit and the rise of Trump, but also the movement’s historical background, psychology, and how we can […]

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Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi

Helter Skelter was so interesting. I’d never really read any true crime before last year (when I went through a fairly intense Simpson trial phase). But after picking up on a lot of hype for The Girls by Emma Cline, combined with a recommendation from a colleague, I ended up spending an interesting fortnight engrossed […]

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