Gwendy’s Button Box by Stephen King

Gwendy’s Button Box would have been a cool addition to a short story collection, but as a standalone novella, it doesn’t really have legs. It has the draw of being set in King’s Castle Rock – probably the town with the world’s fewest TripAdvisor recommendations – but for all that, doesn’t do much with the […]

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The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton

I’d had The Miniaturist kicking around on my Kindle for eons, but might never have gotten round to it had it not come up as my reading group’s book of the month. Despite hearing glowing reviews of Jessie Burton’s work from my brother (whose opinion I generally trust, unless he dislikes something I adore), historical […]

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Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel

I absolutely loved Waking Gods’ predecessor Sleeping Giants – so much so that I read it twice in very short succession, and am pretty sure that I’ll be re-reading it all over again in the not-too-distant future. As a follow-up, Waking Gods did not disappoint. I’m still honestly not sure what has grabbed me so […]

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Universal Harvester by John Darnielle

I loved Wolf in White Van by John Darnielle, and was eager to get my hands on Universal Harvester. The plot sounded like fantastically creepy fun – video store VHS tapes inexplicably spliced with eerie scenes shot at a local barn. Early reviews put me off somewhat – I’ve heard the term “puzzle box” tossed […]

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Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson

I’ve been wanting to read Dark Tales for absolutely ages – and despite the difficulty of obtaining it, am quietly impressed that it isn’t available on Kindle. (I love my Kindle, don’t get me wrong – but this was a perfect book for curling up in bed with with the curtains drawn.) [Edit: Since writing, […]

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The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

The Woman in Cabin 10 wasn’t what I was expecting. I’ve read in the past about people who disappear from cruises never to be seen again, with very little investigation due to the jurisdiction issues of international waters. Ware’s book does touch on that briefly, but the vessel here is more of a grand yacht […]

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Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel

Sleeping Giants has gotten to me in the weirdest, most unexpected way. On almost every level, it should slot neatly alongside the myriad of fun-but-forgettable stories I read/listen to endlessly and immediately move on from. The writing is solid but not stunning, the plot is damn good fun but not life-changing, and there’s a love […]

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